With teachers watching, Kentucky court to consider pensions

Headline News

Kentucky's governor and attorney general are headed to the state Supreme Court to argue about the future of one of the country's worst-funded pension systems.
 
Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear says lawmakers did not follow the rules when they passed the bill. Republican Gov. Matt Bevin says the law is crucial to the system's solvency. The state Supreme Court will hear arguments in the case on Thursday.

The case has political implications. Bevin is running for re-election in 2019 and Beshear wants to oppose him. Kentucky Educational Television will broadcast the hearing live. Beshear will argue the case himself.

The law would put new teacher hires into a hybrid pension system, among other changes. Thousands of teachers protested the law at the Capitol earlier this year.

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Grounds for Divorce in Ohio - Sylkatis Law, LLC

A divorce in Ohio is filed when there is typically “fault” by one of the parties and party not at “fault” seeks to end the marriage. A court in Ohio may grant a divorce for the following reasons:
• Willful absence of the adverse party for one year
• Adultery
• Extreme cruelty
• Fraudulent contract
• Any gross neglect of duty
• Habitual drunkenness
• Imprisonment in a correctional institution at the time of filing the complaint
• Procurement of a divorce outside this state by the other party

Additionally, there are two “no-fault” basis for which a court may grant a divorce:
• When the parties have, without interruption for one year, lived separate and apart without cohabitation
• Incompatibility, unless denied by either party

However, whether or not the the court grants the divorce for “fault” or not, in Ohio the party not at “fault” will not get a bigger slice of the marital property.

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